The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities: What our members have been doing

The UN CRPD committee regularly reviews states that have ratified the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Inclusion Europe's members are active in bringing the points of view of people with intellectual disabilities and their families to the attention of the committee. Find out more about what they have been up to.

The UN CRPD: What our members have been doing

The UN CRPD committee regularly reviews states that have ratified the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Inclusion Europe’s members are active in bringing the points of view of people with intellectual disabilities and their families to the attention of the committee. See here what they have been up to:

Belgium

Inclusion asbl, through its participation in the Belgian Disability Forum, recently presented Belgium’s alternative report on the rights of people with intellectual disabilities to the UN CRPD Committee.

In this alternative report, several areas for improvement were highlighted, such as:
– consultation of people with disabilities;
– reliable and comprehensive statistics on disability in Belgium;
– recognition of legal capacity on the basis of equality with others;
– accessibility;
– employment;
– inclusive education;
– inclusion in society

The report was presented at the UN CRPD by representatives of organisations of people with disabilities, and the Belgian equality body Unia.

Estonia

EVPIT gave their input to the shadow report of the Estonian “Chamber of Disabled People”. They took part (via live feed) when the report was presented at the United Nations. EVPIT drew attention to the fact that though there has been a lot of progress regarding accessibility for people with physical disabilities in Estonia, this does not apply to people with intellectual disabilities: Easy-to-read materials e.g. are practically unknown. Some good practice examples have been produced by EVPIT, but the need has not yet been recognised on the national level.

Germany

Lebenshilfe Germany participates in the parallel reporting of German organisations of people with disabilities, especially the German Disability Council (Deutscher Behindertenrat).

Germany will be facing its second periodic review in 2020. In preparation to this, Lebenshilfe Germany has been in contact with committee members regarding the questions the country has received this spring. These questions include topics such as:

  • inclusive education and the persisting segregation into “special needs” schools
  • the right to self-determination and the replacement of guardianship in favour of supported decision-making
  • the right to independent living
  • childrens’ right to not be separated from their family because of their disability
  • the right to employment

In 2020, the organisation will participate in the drafting of the alternative report for the second review.

Iceland

Iceland ratified the CRPD in 2016 and is currently preparing its initial report to the UN CRPD committee. Þroskahjálp has been in contact with the ministries writing the report, especially the Ministry of Welfare. The organisation has also received a grant to support people with intellectual disabilities to give these ministries their opinion, and advice on important issues regarding the implementation of the CRPD in Iceland. This especially refers to the current situation, rights and interests of people with disabilities. The project is nearly finished and a report will be published, which aims to influence the areas Iceland’s official initial report will address.

Þroskahjálp will furthermore submit an alternative report to the CRDP committee – either on its own or in cooperation with other organisations promoting and protecting the rights of people with disabilities in Iceland. For this report, Þroskahjálp will use the results of the document prepared by people with intellectual disabilities.

Slovakia

ZPMPVSR collaborated in drawing up the alternative report of the Slovak Disability Council. In the report, they e.g. pointed out that in Slovakia:

  • Someone’s legal capacity can still be restricted based upon intellectual disability. Slovak law only knows substitute decision-making, and does not mention supported decision-making as an alternative.
  • There are many people with disabilities who are placed in institutions on the basis of a contract concluded between the guardian and the institution, regardless of their will. This situation is not even legally recognized as a deprivation of liberty.
  • Children with intellectual disabilities cannot be enrolled in secondary school.

Have a look at our easy-to-understand videos to find out more about the United Nations, the UN CRPD and the UN CRPD committee!

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