5 steps to prevent harm to people with intellectual disabilities and their families in Coronavirus emergency.

5 steps to prevent harm to people with intellectual disabilities and their families in Coronavirus emergency. There are recommendations, examples and practices for each of these 5 steps.

5 steps to prevent harm to people with intellectual disabilities and their families in Coronavirus emergency.

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Inform clearly

Inform clearly about what people should do to protect themselves and others.
Deliver the information to people with intellectual disabilities and their families.

Easy to understand information is important.
Especially when there are many, often conflicting, news and information.

Tell people clearly what they need to do to protect themselves and others.
Provide a phone number and email address where people can get more information.

Here are:
• Examples of easy-to-read about the Coronavirus.
• How the German government is using easy-to-read
• More information on easy-to-read is and how to produce it.

Easy to understand is not only about written text.
Video can also be produced in that way. We have examples.

Deliver the information

Having the information is one thing, delivering it to those who need it is yet another.
Reach out to organisations of people with intellectual disabilities and ask them for help to get the information out.

We can also help spread the message:
• comms@inclusion-europe.org
Facebook
 Twitter
LinkedIn

Ensure the accessibility of apps, websites and phone-lines
providing support during the emergency.

 

Help to deal with the emergency

Help to deal with the emergency, limited services and crisis plans.
Help to overcome isolation while social distancing measures are in place.

Provide protective equipment to people with disabilities and to those who support them:
Does your distribution reach families of children and adults with disabilities?
And residential services?

Many day-care centres are closed. This means families taking over and being exposed to many risks:
loss of income, high levels of stress and other consequences. Look for ways to support them.

Apply emergency social security measures to families caring for people with disabilities, including adults.

Support people with disabilities and families in crisis planning and arrangements.

If you take part in voluntary activities such as grocery shopping for others, please consider people with disabilities and their families.

Learn from countries and organisations are doing for people with disabilities.

Help to deal with isolation

Do you organise online activities to help people overcome social isolation?

Please reach out to people with disabilities and families.

Do you provide online learning tools for children out of school?
Are you involving families of children with intellectual disabilities?

“People with disabilities feel they have been left behind. Containment measures, such as social distancing and self-isolation, may be impossible for those who rely on the support of others to eat, dress and bathe.” Catalina Devandas, UN Special Rapporteur on the rights of persons with disabilities

 

Protect disability rights and related funding

Protect disability rights and related funding.

We have noticed attempts by some governments to use the Coronavirus emergency as a cover to restricts the rights of people with disabilities.

That is not acceptable. Protect the rights of people with disabilities in all actions taken to deal with the pandemic.

This includes providing nondiscriminatory medical guidance. Ensure the emergency
measures are taken to support people and businesses included people with intellectual disabilities and their families, disability
organisations and service providers.

Avoid any cuts to disability related funding, such as to disability benefits, social services or disabled people organisations.

Download this text in .pdf:

Text version for translations (.docx)

Find more resources here, including easy-to-read in nearly 20 languages, situation in Europe and resources for many situations.

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