European Parliament marks 25th anniversary of UN CRC with adoption of resolution

The European Parliament has adopted a resolution putting children at the centre of European Union legislation 25 years after the adoption of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UN CRC).

European Parliament marks 25th anniversary of UN CRC with adoption of resolution
etrThe United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (for short UN CRC)
was written 25 years ago.The UN CRC makes sure that children have rights.Lots of countries have signed the UN CRC.The European Parliament made a law this week.The law helps children have more rights.It also says that countries must think about children
when they make laws.

The European Parliament is important because
it makes lots of important laws.

The European Parliament has adopted a resolution putting children at the centre of European Union legislation 25 years after the adoption of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UN CRC).

The resolution passed through the Parliament’s monthly plenary session in Strasbourg on 27 November following parliamentary debate the previous day.

Calling primarily on member states to consider children as a priority in future regional and cohesion policies, the European Parliament has strongly outlined its commitment to continue working within the framework of the UN CRC, putting the issue of children’s rights firmly on the European Union’s agenda.

The prioritization of children in regional and cohesion policies would directly impact upon the implementation of the European Disability Strategy 2010-2020, among others, which works to remove the barriers preventing people with disabilities from equally participating in public life and accessing community-based services.

The resolution also calls on member states to reduce social exclusion among young people and children and ensure that EU funds are of greatest benefit to the most disadvantaged and vulnerable children across Europe.

To read the resolution in full, click here.

Search
Archives
back-to-top